1955–56 European Cup Real Madrid C.F. in international football competitions
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1955–56 European Cup Real Madrid C.F. in international football competitions

UEFA European Championship

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For other uses, see European Championship in football .

UEFA European Championship
Founded 1960
RegionEurope ( UEFA )
Number of teams24 (finals)
55 (eligible to enter qualification)
Qualifier for FIFA Confederations Cup
Current champions  Portugal (1st title)
Most successful team(s) width=”23″ height=”14″ srcset=”//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/b/ba/Flag_of_Germany.svg/35px-Flag_of_Germany.svg.png 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/b/ba/Flag_of_Germany.svg/46px-Flag_of_Germany.svg.png 2x” data-file-width=”1000″ data-file-height=”600″ />  Germany
  Spain
(3 titles each)
Website Official website
UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying
Euro 2016 stade de France France-Roumanie (27307532960).jpg

UEFA Euro 2016 match between France and Romania
Tournaments
  • 1960
  • 1964
  • 1968
  • 1972
  • 1976
  • 1980
  • 1984
  • 1988
  • 1992
  • 1996
  • 2000
  • 2004
  • 2008
  • 2012
  • 2016
  • 2020
  • 2024
  • 2028

The UEFA European Championship (known informally as the Euros) is the primary association football competition contested by the senior men’s national teams of the members of the Union of European Football Associations ( UEFA ), determining the continental champion of Europe. Held every four years since 1960 , in the even-numbered year between World Cup tournaments, it was originally called the UEFA European Nations’ Cup, changing to the current name in 1968 . Starting with the 1996 tournament , specific championships are often referred to in the form “UEFA Euro [year]”; this format has since been retroactively applied to earlier tournaments.

Prior to entering the tournament all teams other than the host nations (which qualify automatically) compete in a qualifying process . The championship winners earn the opportunity to compete in the following FIFA Confederations Cup , but are not obliged to do so. [1]

The 15 European Championship tournaments have been won by ten national teams: Germany and Spain each have won three titles, France has two titles, and Soviet Union , Italy , Czechoslovakia , Netherlands , Denmark , Greece and Portugal have won one title each. To date, Spain is the only team in history to have won consecutive titles, doing so in 2008 and 2012. It is the second most watched football tournament in the world after the FIFA World Cup. The Euro 2012 final was watched by a global audience of around 300 million. [2]

The most recent championship , hosted by France in 2016, was won by Portugal, who beat France 1–0 in the final at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis after extra time. The final also attracted 284 million viewers which is the second most viewed game in European tournament history. [3]

Contents

  • 1 History
    • 1.1 Beginnings
    • 1.2 Expansion to 8 teams
    • 1.3 Expansion to 16 teams
    • 1.4 Expansion to 24 teams
  • 2 Trophy
  • 3 Format
    • 3.1 The competition
    • 3.2 Qualifying
    • 3.3 Final tournament
  • 4 Results
  • 5 Summary
  • 6 Records and statistics
  • 7 See also
  • 8 References
  • 9 External links

History[ edit ]

Beginnings[ edit ]

Map of countries’ best results. 10 countries have won, counting Germany and West Germany as one

The idea for a pan-European football tournament was first proposed by the French Football Federation ‘s secretary-general Henri Delaunay in 1927, but it was not until 1958 that the tournament was started, three years after Delaunay’s death. [4] [5] In honour of Delaunay, the trophy awarded to the champions is named after him. [6] The 1960 tournament , held in France, had four teams competing in the finals out of 17 that entered the competition. [7] It was won by the Soviet Union , beating Yugoslavia 2–1 in a tense final in Paris . [8] Spain withdrew from its quarter-final match against the USSR because of two political protests. [9] Of the 17 teams that entered the qualifying tournament, notable absentees were England , the Netherlands , West Germany and Italy . [10]

Spain held the next tournament in 1964 , which saw an increase in entries to the qualification tournament, with 29 entering; [11] West Germany was a notable absentee once again and Greece withdrew after being drawn against Albania , with whom they were still at war. [12] The hosts beat the title holders, the Soviet Union, 2–1 at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium in Madrid . [13]

The tournament format stayed the same for the 1968 tournament , hosted and won by Italy. [14] [15] For the first and only time a match was decided on a coin toss (the semi-final Italy vs. Soviet Union) [16] and the final went to a replay , after the match against Yugoslavia finished 1–1. [17] Italy won the replay 2–0. [18] More teams entered this tournament (31), a testament to its burgeoning popularity. [19]

Belgium hosted the 1972 tournament , which West Germany won, beating the USSR 3–0 in the final , with goals coming from Gerd Müller (twice) and Herbert Wimmer at the Heysel Stadium in Brussels . [20] This tournament would provide a taste of things to come, as the German side contained many of the key members of the 1974 FIFA World Cup Champions. [21] [22]

The 1976 tournament in Yugoslavia was the last in which only four teams took part in the final tournament, and the last in which the hosts had to qualify. Czechoslovakia beat West Germany in the newly introduced penalty shootout . After seven successful conversions, Uli Hoeneß missed, leaving Czechoslovakian Antonín Panenka with the opportunity to score and win the tournament. An “audacious” chipped shot, [23] described by UEFA as “perhaps the most famous spot kick of all time” secured the victory as Czechoslovakia won 5–3 on penalties. [24]

Expansion to 8 teams[ edit ]

The competition was expanded to eight teams in the 1980 tournament , again hosted by Italy. It involved a group stage, with the winners of the groups going on to contest the final, and the runners-up playing in the third place play-off. [25] West Germany won their second European title by beating Belgium 2–1, with two goals scored by Horst Hrubesch at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome . [26] Horst Hrubesch scored early in the first half before René Vandereycken equalised for Belgium with a penalty in the second half. With two minutes remaining, Hrubesch headed the winner for West Germany from a Karl-Heinz Rummenigge corner . [27]

France won their first major title at home in the 1984 tournament , with their captain Michel Platini scoring 9 goals in just 5 games, including the opening goal in the final, in which they beat Spain 2–0. [28] [29] The format also changed, with the top two teams in each group going through to a semi-final stage, instead of the winners of each group going straight into the final. The third place play-off was also abolished. [30]

West Germany hosted UEFA Euro 1988 , but lost 2–1 to the Netherlands , their traditional rivals , in the semi-finals, which sparked vigorous celebrations in the Netherlands. [31] [32] The Netherlands went on to win the tournament in a rematch of their first game of the group stage, beating the USSR 2–0 at the Olympia Stadion in Munich , [33] a match in which Marco van Basten scored one of the most memorable goals in football history, a spectacular volley over the keeper from the right wing. [34]

UEFA Euro 1992 was held in Sweden, and was won by Denmark , who were only in the finals because UEFA did not allow Yugoslavia to participate as some of the states constituting the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia were at war with each other . [35] [36] The Danes beat holders the Netherlands on penalties in the semi-finals, [37] then defeated world champion Germany 2–0. [38] This was the first tournament in which a unified Germany took part and also the first major tournament to have the players’ names printed on their backs.

Expansion to 16 teams[ edit ]

England hosted UEFA Euro 1996 , the first tournament to use the nomenclature “Euro [year]” and would see the number of teams taking part double to 16. [39] The hosts, in a replay of the 1990 FIFA World Cup semi-final, were knocked out on penalties by Germany, [40] who would go on to win in the Final 2–1 against the newly formed Czech Republic thanks to the first golden goal ever in a major tournament, scored by Oliver Bierhoff . [41] [42] This was Germany’s first title as a unified nation.

UEFA Euro 2000 was the first tournament to be held by two countries, in the Netherlands and Belgium. [43] France, the reigning World Cup champions , were favoured to win, and they lived up to expectations when they beat Italy 2–1 after extra time , having come from being 1–0 down: Sylvain Wiltord equalised in the very last minute of the game and David Trezeguet scored the winner in extra time. [44]

The UEFA Euro 2004 opening ceremony in Portugal .

UEFA Euro 2004 , like 1992, produced an upset: Greece , who had only qualified for one World Cup ( 1994 ) and one European Championship ( 1980 ) before, beat hosts Portugal 1–0 in the final (after having also beaten them in the opening game) with a goal scored by Angelos Charisteas in the 57th minute to win a tournament that they had been given odds of 150–1 to win before it began (being the second least likely team to have any success after Latvia ). [45] On their way to the Final , they also beat holders France [46] as well as the Czech Republic with a silver goal , [47] [48] a rule which replaced the previous golden goal in 2003, before being abolished itself shortly after this tournament. [49]

The 2008 tournament , hosted by Austria and Switzerland , marked the second time that two nations co-hosted and the first edition where the new trophy was awarded. [50] It commenced on 7 June and finished on 29 June. [51] The Final between Germany and Spain was held at the Ernst Happel Stadion in Vienna . [52] Spain defeated Germany 1–0, with a goal scored by Fernando Torres in the 33rd minute, sparking much celebration across the country. [53] This was their first title since the 1964 tournament. Spain were the highest scoring team with 12 goals scored and David Villa finished as the top scorer with four goals. Xavi was awarded the player of the tournament, and nine Spanish players were picked for the team of the tournament .

The UEFA Euro 2012 tournament was co-hosted by Poland and Ukraine. [54] Spain defeated Italy 4–0 in the final, thus becoming the first nation to defend a European Championship title and the first nation to win three major international tournaments in succession (Euro 2008, 2010 World Cup , Euro 2012). [55] In scoring the third goal of the Final , Fernando Torres became the first player to score in two European Championship finals. He was equal top scorer for the tournament with three goals in total, along with Mario Balotelli , Alan Dzagoev , Mario Gómez , Mario Mandžukić , and Cristiano Ronaldo , despite only being used as a substitute player. The tournament was otherwise notable for having the most headed goals in a Euro tournament (26 out of 76 goals in total); a disallowed goal in the England versus Ukraine group game which replays showed had crossed the goal line, and which prompted President of FIFA Sepp Blatter to tweet, “GLT ( Goal-line technology ) is no longer an alternative but a necessity”, [56] thus reversing his long-held reluctance to embrace such technology; and some crowd violence in group games.

Expansion to 24 teams[ edit ]

In 2007, the Football Association of Ireland and Scottish Football Association proposed the expansion of the tournament, which was later confirmed by the UEFA Executive Committee in September 2008. [57] [58] Out of the 54 member associations of UEFA, only three including England and Germany opposed the expansion. [59] On 28 May 2010, UEFA announced that Euro 2016 would be hosted by France. France beat bids of Turkey (7–6 in voting in second voting round) and Italy, which had the least votes in first voting round. [60] UEFA Euro 2016 was the first to have 24 teams in the finals. [61] This was the third time France have hosted the competition. Portugal, which qualified for the knock-out phase despite finishing third in its group, went on to win the championship by defeating heavily favoured host team France 1–0 in the final, thanks to a goal from Eder in the 109th minute. Cristiano Ronaldo , Portugal’s world renowned striker, came out of the game due to injury in the 25th minute. This was the first time Portugal won a major tournament.

For the 2020 tournament , three bids were proposed, including a bid from Turkey, [62] a joint bid from the Republic of Ireland, Scotland and Wales, [63] and a joint bid from Georgia and Azerbaijan. [64] In December 2012, however, UEFA announced that the 2020 tournament would be hosted in several cities in various countries across Europe. [65] The venues were selected and announced by UEFA on 19 September 2014. [66] However, Brussels was removed as a host city on 7 December 2017 due to delays with the building of the Eurostadium . [67]

Trophy[ edit ]

The current trophy

The Henri Delaunay Trophy, which is awarded to the winner of the European Championship, is named in honour of Henri Delaunay , the first General Secretary of UEFA, who came up with the idea of a European championship but died five years prior to the first tournament in 1960. His son, Pierre , was in charge of creating the trophy. [68] Since the first tournament it has been awarded to the winning team for them to keep for four years, until the next tournament.

For the 2008 tournament , the Henri Delaunay Trophy was remodelled to make it larger, as the old trophy was overshadowed by UEFA’s other trophies such as the new European Champion Clubs’ Cup . The new trophy, which is made of sterling silver, now weighs 8 kilograms (18 lb) and is 60 centimetres (24 in) tall, being seven inches longer and one pound heavier than the old one. The marble plinth that was serving as base was removed. The new silver base of the trophy had to be enlarged to make it stable. The names of the winning countries that had appeared on the plinth are now engraved on the back of the trophy. [69]

The players and coaches of the winning team and the runner-up team are awarded gold and silver medals, respectively. Each association that competes in the final tournament receives a commemorative plaque. Each losing semi-finalist as well as each finalist receive a dedicated plaque. Though there is no longer a third place play-off , UEFA decided in the 2008 edition to award the semi-final losers (Turkey and Russia) bronze medals for the first time, [70] and did the same in the 2012 edition when Germany and Portugal received bronze medals. [71] However, UEFA decided that losing semi-finalists would no longer receive medals from the 2016 edition onwards. [72] Bronze medals were previously awarded for winners of the third place play-off, the last of which was held in 1980.

Format[ edit ]

The competition[ edit ]

Before 1980, only four teams qualified for the final tournament. From 1980, eight teams competed. In 1996 the tournament expanded to 16 teams, since it was easier for European nations to qualify for the World Cup than their own continental championship; 14 of the 24 teams at the 1982 , 1986 and 1990 World Cups had been European, whereas the European Championship finals still involved only eight teams.

For 2016, the competition has increased to 24 teams. In 2007, there was much discussion about an expansion of the tournament to 24 teams, started by Scotland and the Republic of Ireland , due to the increased number of football associations in Europe after the break-ups of Czechoslovakia , Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union , and the inclusion of Israel and Kazakhstan . The new president of UEFA , Michel Platini , was reported to be in favour of expansion which proved an accurate assumption. Whilst on 17 April 2007, UEFA’s Executive Committee formally decided against expansion in 2012, Platini indicated in June 2008 that UEFA will increase participation from 16 to 24 teams in future tournaments, starting from 2016. [73] On 25 September, it was announced by Franz Beckenbauer that an agreement had been reached, and the expansion to 24 teams would be officially announced the next day. [74]

The competing teams are chosen by a series of qualifying games: in 1960 and 1964 through home and away play-offs ; from 1968 through a combination of both qualifying groups and play-off games. The host country was selected from the four finalists after they were determined through qualifying.

Since the expansion of the final tournament starting from 1980 , the host country, or countries, have been chosen beforehand and qualify automatically.

Qualifying[ edit ]

Main article: UEFA European Championship qualifying

To qualify, a team must finish in one of the qualifying spots or win a play-off. After this, a team proceeds to the finals round in the host country, although hosts qualify for the tournament automatically. The qualifying phase begins in the autumn after the preceding FIFA World Cup, almost two years before the finals.

The groups for qualification are drawn by a UEFA committee using seeding . Seeded teams include reigning champions, and other teams on the basis of their performance in the preceding FIFA World Cup qualifying and the last European Championship qualifying. To obtain an accurate view of the teams abilities, a ranking is produced. This is calculated by taking the total number of points won by a particular team and dividing it by the number of games played, i.e. points per game. In the case of a team having hosted one of the two previous competitions and therefore having qualified automatically, only the results from the single most recent qualifying competition are used. If two teams have equal points per game, the committee then bases their positions in the rankings on:

  1. Coefficient from the matches played in its most recent qualifying competition.
  2. Average goal difference.
  3. Average number of goals scored.
  4. Average number of away goals scored.
  5. Drawing of lots.

The qualifying phase is played in a group format, the composition of the groups is determined through means of a draw of teams from pre-defined seeded bowls. The draw takes place after the preceding World Cup’s qualifying competition. For UEFA Euro 2012 , the group qualifying phase consists of nine groups; six of six teams and the remainder of five teams each.

Each group is played in a league format with teams playing each other home and away. Teams then either qualify for the final tournament or to further playoffs depending on their position in the group. As with most leagues, the points are awarded as three for a win , one for a draw, and none for a loss. In the eventuality of one or more teams having equal points after all matches have been played, the following criteria are used to distinguish the sides:

  1. Higher number of points obtained in the group matches played among the teams in question.
  2. Superior goal difference from the group matches played among the teams in question.
  3. Higher number of goals scored in the group matches played among the teams in question.
  4. Higher number of goals scored away from home in the group matches played among the teams in question.
  5. Results of all group matches:
    1. Superior goal difference
    2. Higher number of goals scored
    3. Higher number of goals scored away from home
    4. Fair play conduct.
  6. Drawing of lots.

Final tournament[ edit ]

Sixteen teams progressed to the final tournament for the 2012 tournament . They were joint hosts Poland and Ukraine , the winners and the highest ranked second placed team from the nine qualifying groups as well as the winners of four play-off matches between the runners-up of the other groups. These sixteen teams were divided equally into four groups, A, B, C and D, each consisting of four teams. The groups were drawn up by the UEFA administration, again using seeding. The seeded teams being the host nations, the reigning champions, subject to qualification, and those with the best points per game coefficients over the qualifying phase of the tournament and the previous World Cup qualifying . Other finalists were assigned to by means of a draw, using coefficients as a basis.

For the 2016 tournament, the expansion to 24 teams means that the teams will be drawn into six groups of four, with the six group winners, six group runners-up and the four best third-placed teams advancing to the round of 16 when it becomes a knockout competition. [72]

The groups are again played in a league format, where a team plays its opponents once each. The same points system is used (three points for a win, one point for a draw, no points for a defeat). A schedule for the group matches will be drawn up, but the last two matches in a group must kick off simultaneously. The winner and runner-up of each group progresses to the next round, where a knockout system is used (the two teams play each other once, the winner progresses), this is used in all subsequent rounds as well. The winners of the quarter-finals matches progress to the semi-finals, where the winners play in the final. If in any of the knockout rounds, the scores are still equal after normal playing time, extra time and penalties are employed to separate the two teams. Unlike the FIFA World Cup , this tournament no longer has a third place playoff .

Results[ edit ]

See also: List of UEFA European Championship finals
YearHostFinalThird place playoffNumber of teams
WinnersScoreRunners-upThird placeScoreFourth place
1960
Details
  France
Soviet Union
2–1 ( a.e.t. )
Yugoslavia

Czechoslovakia
2–0
France
4
1964
Details
  Spain
Spain
2–1
Soviet Union

Hungary
3–1 ( a.e.t. )
Denmark
4
1968
Details
  Italy
Italy
1–1 ( a.e.t. )
2–0 ( replay )

Yugoslavia

England
2–0
Soviet Union
4
1972
Details
  Belgium
West Germany
3–0
Soviet Union

Belgium
2–1
Hungary
4
1976
Details
  Yugoslavia
Czechoslovakia
2–2 ( a.e.t. )
(5–3 p )

West Germany

Netherlands
3–2 ( a.e.t. )
Yugoslavia
4
1980
Details
  Italy
West Germany
2–1
Belgium

Czechoslovakia
1–1 [A]
(9–8 p )

Italy
8
YearHost(s)FinalLosing semi-finalists [B] Number of teams
WinnerScoreRunner-up
1984
Details
  France
France
2–0
Spain
  Denmark and   Portugal 8
1988
Details
  West Germany
Netherlands
2–0
Soviet Union
  Italy and   West Germany 8
1992
Details
  Sweden
Denmark
2–0
Germany
  Netherlands and   Sweden 8
1996
Details
  England
Germany
2–1 ( a.g.g.e.t. )
Czech Republic
  England and   France 16
2000
Details
  Belgium
  Netherlands

France
2–1 ( a.g.g.e.t. )
Italy
  Netherlands and   Portugal 16
2004
Details
  Portugal
Greece
1–0
Portugal
  Czech Republic and   Netherlands 16
2008
Details
  Austria
   Switzerland

Spain
1–0
Germany
  Russia and   Turkey 16
2012
Details
  Poland
  Ukraine

Spain
4–0
Italy
  Germany and   Portugal 16
2016
Details
  France
Portugal
1–0 ( a.e.t. )
France
  Germany and   Wales 24
2020
Details
Europe Pan-European24
2024
Details
  Germany24
  1. ^ No extra time was played.
  2. ^ No third place play-off has been played since 1980; losing semi-finalists are listed in alphabetical order.

Summary[ edit ]

See also: UEFA European Championship comprehensive team results by tournament

Map of winners. Germany: twice as West Germany and once as united Germany, Russia as Soviet Union and Czech Republic as Czechoslovakia

TeamWinnersRunners-up
  Germany ^3 ( 1972 , 1980 , 1996 )3 ( 1976 , 1992 , 2008 )
  Spain 3 ( 1964 * , 2008 , 2012 )1 ( 1984 )
  France 2 ( 1984 * , 2000 )1 ( 2016 * )
  Soviet Union # 1 ( 1960 )3 ( 1964 , 1972 , 1988 )
  Italy 1 ( 1968 * )2 ( 2000 , 2012 )
  Portugal 1 ( 2016 )1 ( 2004 * )
  Czechoslovakia # 1 ( 1976 )
  Netherlands 1 ( 1988 )
  Denmark 1 ( 1992 )
  Greece 1 ( 2004 )
  Yugoslavia # 2 ( 1960 , 1968 )
  Belgium 1 ( 1980 )
  Czech Republic 1 ( 1996 )
* = hosts
^ = includes results representing West Germany between 1960 and 1988
# = states that have since split into two or more independent nations

Records and statistics[ edit ]

Main article: List of UEFA European Championship records

See also[ edit ]

  • Football continental championships
  • British Home Championship
  • Central European International Cup
  • National team appearances in the UEFA European Championship
  • List of UEFA European Championship goalscorers
  • UEFA European Championship Teams of the Tournament
  • UEFA Women’s Championship
  • UEFA European Under-21 Championship
  • UEFA European Under-19 Championship
  • UEFA European Under-17 Championship
  • UEFA European Championship mascot
  • UEFA Nations League , a tournament commencing in 2018

References[ edit ]

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  57. ^ “Uefa to expand Euro Championship” . BBC Sport . British Broadcasting Corporation. 26 September 2008. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
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  62. ^ “TFF Başkanı’ndan Açıklama” [TFF President Announcement] (in Turkish). Turkish Football Federation . 17 April 2012. Retrieved 11 June 2012.
  63. ^ “Scotland and Wales consider late joint bid to stage Euro 2020” . The Guardian . Guardian Media Group . 14 May 2012. Retrieved 11 June 2012.
  64. ^ “Georgia makes solo bid for Euro 2020” . AFP. 15 May 2012. Retrieved 11 June 2012.
  65. ^ “UEFA EURO 2020 to be held across continent” . UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations . 6 December 2012. Retrieved 24 January 2013.
  66. ^ “Wembley to stage UEFA EURO 2020 final” . UEFA.com. 19 September 2014.
  67. ^ “EURO 2020 to open in Rome, more London games, venues paired” . UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 7 December 2017. Retrieved 7 December 2017.
  68. ^ Harrold, Michael (27 January 2006). “You won’t find a superior trophy” . UEFA.com. London: Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 13 January 2012.
  69. ^ “New trophy for UEFA EURO 2008” . UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 24 January 2006. Retrieved 13 January 2012.
  70. ^ “Regulations of the UEFA European Football Championship 2006/08” (PDF). 2.08: UEFA. p. 3. Retrieved 11 July 2016.
  71. ^ “Regulations of the UEFA European Football Championship 2010–12” (PDF). 3.08: UEFA. p. 4. Retrieved 4 July 2012.
  72. ^ a b “Regulations of the UEFA European Football Championship 2014–16” (PDF). 4.08: UEFA. p. 11. Retrieved 2 September 2016.
  73. ^ “Uefa sets deadline over Euro 2012” . BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation. 28 June 2008. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  74. ^ “Uefa to expand Euro Championship” . BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation. 26 September 2008. Retrieved 13 May 2011.

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  • 2012 : Italy Balotelli , Russia Dzagoev , Germany Gómez , Croatia Mandžukić , Portugal Ronaldo & Spain Torres *
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*: Golden Boot award winner (when goals scored are tied)
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  • 1996: Germany Sammer
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      1955–56 European Cup

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      1955–56 European Cup
      Paris-Parc-des-Princes.jpg

      The Parc des Princes in Paris hosted the final.
      Tournament details
      Dates4 September 1955 – 13 June 1956
      Teams16
      Final positions
      Champions Spain Real Madrid (1st title)
      Runners-up France Reims
      Tournament statistics
      Matches played29
      Goals scored127 (4.38 per match)
      Top scorer(s) Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Miloš Milutinović (8 goals)
      1956–57 →

      The 1955–56 European Cup was the first season of the European Cup , UEFA ‘s premier club football tournament. The tournament was won by Real Madrid , who defeated Reims 4–3 in the final at Parc des Princes , Paris , on 13 June 1956.

      The participating clubs in the first five seasons of the European Cup were selected by French football magazine L’Equipe on the basis that they were representative and prestigious clubs in Europe. [1] Of the originally selected teams, Chelsea of England were barred from participation by The Football Association , who saw the tournament as a distraction to domestic football. Chelsea were replaced by Gwardia Warszawa of Poland. In addition, Holland Sport , Honvéd and BK Copenhagen rejected the opportunity to represent the Netherlands, Hungary and Denmark respectively, being replaced by PSV Eindhoven , Vörös Lobogó and AGF Aarhus . This was also the only UEFA tournament to include a representative of Saarland , unified into West Germany in 1957.

      The first round pairings were fixed by the organisers and not drawn as would be the case for all future European Cup matches.

      Contents

      • 1 Teams
      • 2 Bracket
      • 3 First round
        • 3.1 First leg
        • 3.2 Second leg
      • 4 Quarter-finals
        • 4.1 First leg
        • 4.2 Second leg
      • 5 Semi-finals
        • 5.1 First leg
        • 5.2 Second leg
      • 6 Final
      • 7 Top goalscorers
      • 8 Notes
      • 9 External links

      Teams[ edit ]

      Austria Rapid Wien Belgium Anderlecht Denmark AGF Aarhus France Reims
      Hungary Vörös Lobogó Italy Milan Netherlands PSV Eindhoven Poland Gwardia Warszawa
      Portugal Sporting CP Saar Protectorate Saarbrücken Scotland Hibernian Spain Real Madrid
      Sweden Djurgården Switzerland Servette West Germany Rot-Weiss Essen Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Partizan

      Bracket[ edit ]

        First round Quarter-finals Semi-finals Final
                           
        Switzerland Servette000 
        Spain Real Madrid 257 
         Spain Real Madrid 404 
         Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Partizan033 
        Portugal Sporting CP325
        Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Partizan 358 
         Spain Real Madrid 415 
         Italy Milan224 
        Austria Rapid Wien 606 
        Netherlands PSV Eindhoven112 
         Austria Rapid Wien123
         Italy Milan 178 
        Italy Milan 347
        Saar Protectorate Saarbrücken415 
         Spain Real Madrid 4
         France Reims3
        Denmark AGF Aarhus022 
        France Reims 224 
         France Reims 448
         Hungary Vörös Lobogó246 
        Hungary Vörös Lobogó 6410
        Belgium Anderlecht314 
         France Reims 213
         Scotland Hibernian000 
        Sweden Djurgården 044 
        Poland Gwardia Warszawa011 
         Sweden Djurgården101
         Scotland Hibernian 314 
        West Germany Rot-Weiss Essen011
        Scotland Hibernian 415 

      First round[ edit ]

      1955–56 European Cup is located in Europe

      Reims
      Reims
      Anderlecht
      Anderlecht
      Partizan
      Partizan
      Vörös Lobogó
      Vörös Lobogó
      Servette
      Servette
      Hibernian
      Hibernian
      Sporting
      Sporting
      Djurgården
      Djurgården
      R. W. Essen
      R. W. Essen
      Gwardia
      Gwardia
      AGF
      AGF
      Rapid
      Rapid
      PSV
      PSV
      Milan
      Milan
      Saarbrücken
      Saarbrücken
      Real Madrid
      Real Madrid

      Location of teams in the 1955–56 European Cup.

      Team 1 Agg.Team 21st leg2nd leg
      Sporting CP Portugal 5–8 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Partizan 3–32–5
      Vörös Lobogó Hungary 10–4 Belgium Anderlecht6–34–1
      Servette Switzerland 0–7 Spain Real Madrid 0–20–5
      Rot-Weiss Essen West Germany 1–5 Scotland Hibernian 0–41–1
      Djurgården Sweden 4–1 Poland Gwardia Warszawa0–04–1
      AGF Aarhus Denmark 2–4 France Reims 0–22–2
      Rapid Wien Austria 6–2 Netherlands PSV Eindhoven6–10–1
      Milan Italy 7–5 Saar Protectorate Saarbrücken3–44–1

      First leg[ edit ]

      Sporting CP Portugal 3–3 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Partizan
      Martins Goal 1478
      Quim Goal 65
      Report M. Milutinović Goal 4550
      Bobek Goal 73
      Estádio Nacional , Lisbon
      Attendance: 30,000
      Referee: Dean Harzic ( France )

      Vörös Lobogó Hungary 6–3 Belgium Anderlecht
      Szimcsák I Goal 8
      Palotás Goal 255980
      Hidegkuti Goal 28
      Sándor Goal 83
      Report Vanderwilt Goal 7
      Van Den Bosch Goal 3979
      MTK Stadion , Budapest
      Attendance: 35,000
      Referee: Friedrich Mayer ( Austria )

      Servette Switzerland 0–2 Spain Real Madrid
      Report Muñoz Goal 74
      Rial Goal 89
      Charmilles Stadium , Geneva
      Attendance: 7,000
      Referee: Robert Sautelle ( France )

      Rot-Weiss Essen West Germany 0–4 Scotland Hibernian
      Report Turnbull Goal 3553
      L. Reilly Goal 44
      Ormond Goal 81
      Georg-Melches-Stadion , Essen
      Attendance: 5,000
      Referee: Johann Bronkhorst ( Netherlands )

      Djurgården Sweden 0–0 Poland Gwardia Warszawa
      Report
      Stockholm Olympic Stadium , Stockholm
      Attendance: 3,574
      Referee: Jarl Hansen ( Denmark )

      AGF Aarhus Denmark 0–2 France Reims
      Report Glovacki Goal 772
      Idrætsparken , Copenhagen
      Attendance: 18,000
      Referee: Klaas Schipper ( Netherlands )

      Rapid Wien Austria 6–1 Netherlands PSV Eindhoven
      A. Körner Goal 126282
      Mehsarosch Goal 55
      Hanappi Goal 56
      Probst Goal 60
      Report Fransen Goal 18
      Pfarrwiese , Vienna
      Attendance: 10,000
      Referee: Emil Schmetzer ( West Germany )

      Milan Italy 3–4 Saar Protectorate Saarbrücken
      Frignani Goal 15
      Schiaffino Goal 33
      Dal Monte Goal 37
      Report Krieger Goal 5
      Philippi Goal 43
      Schirra Goal 67
      Martin Goal 69
      San Siro , Milan
      Attendance: 18,000
      Referee: Gottfried Dienst ( Switzerland )

      Second leg[ edit ]

      Real Madrid Spain 5–0 Switzerland Servette
      Di Stéfano Goal 2961
      Iglesias Goal 44
      Rial Goal 46
      Molowny Goal 54
      Report
      Santiago Bernabéu Stadium , Madrid
      Attendance: 40,318
      Referee: Riccardo Pieri ( Italy )

      Real Madrid won 7–0 on aggregate.


      Partizan Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 5–2 Portugal Sporting CP
      M. Milutinović Goal 15296474
      Jocić Goal 88
      Report Brandão Goal 4977
      Partizan Stadium , Belgrade
      Attendance: 15,000
      Referee: György Dankó ( Hungary )

      Partizan won 8–5 on aggregate.


      Hibernian Scotland 1–1 West Germany Rot-Weiss Essen
      Buchanan Goal 5 Report Abromeit Goal 47
      Easter Road , Edinburgh
      Attendance: 30,000
      Referee: Arthur Edward Ellis ( England )

      Hibernian won 5–1 on aggregate.


      Gwardia Warszawa Poland 1–4 Sweden Djurgården
      Baszkiewicz Goal 14 Report Eriksson Goal 51722
      Sandberg Goal 29
      Wojska Polskiego , Warsaw
      Attendance: 25,000
      Referee: Dean Harzic ( France )

      Djurgården won 4–1 on aggregate.


      Anderlecht Belgium 1–4 Hungary Vörös Lobogó
      Van Den Bosch Goal 38 Report Hidegkuti Goal 25
      Lantos Goal 78
      Palotás Goal 85
      Kovács I Goal 86
      Émile Versé Stadium , Anderlecht
      Attendance: 33,000
      Referee: Johan Bronkhorst ( Netherlands )

      Vörös Lobogó won 10–4 on aggregate.


      Reims France 2–2 Denmark AGF Aarhus
      Glovacki Goal 47
      Bliard Goal 60
      Report Erik Bechmann Jensen Goal 77
      Bjerregaard Goal 83
      Stade Auguste Delaune , Reims
      Attendance: 5,845
      Referee: Alfred Bond ( England )

      Reims won 4–2 on aggregate.


      PSV Eindhoven Netherlands 1–0 Austria Rapid Wien
      Fransen Goal 9 Report
      Philips Stadion , Eindhoven
      Attendance: 8,000
      Referee: Aloïs Smidts ( Belgium )

      Rapid Wien won 6–2 on aggregate.


      Saarbrücken Saar Protectorate 1–4 Italy Milan
      Binkert Goal 32 Report Valli Goal 877
      Puff Goal 75 ( o.g. )
      Beraldo Goal 86
      Ludwigspark Stadion , Saarbrücken
      Attendance: 15,000
      Referee: Klaas Schipper ( Netherlands )

      Milan won 7–5 on aggregate.

      Quarter-finals[ edit ]

      Team 1 Agg.Team 21st leg2nd leg
      Djurgården Sweden 1–4 Scotland Hibernian 1–30–1
      Reims France 8–6 Hungary Vörös Lobogó4–24–4
      Real Madrid Spain 4–3 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Partizan4–00–3
      Rapid Wien Austria 3–8 Italy Milan 1–12–7

      First leg[ edit ]

      Djurgården Sweden 1–3 Scotland Hibernian
      Eklund Goal 1 Report Combe Goal 18
      Mulkerrin Goal 49
      Olsson Goal 86 ( o.g. )
      Firhill Park , Glasgow [2]
      Attendance: 21,962
      Referee: Arthur Edward Ellis ( England )

      Reims France 4–2 Hungary Vörös Lobogó
      Glovacki Goal 14
      Leblond Goal 3357
      Bliard Goal 42
      Report Szolnok Goal 34
      Lantos Goal 77 ( pen. )
      Parc des Princes , Paris
      Attendance: 36,088
      Referee: Gottfried Dienst ( Switzerland )

      Real Madrid Spain 4–0 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Partizan
      Castaño Goal 1223
      Gento Goal 36
      Di Stéfano Goal 70
      Report
      Santiago Bernabéu Stadium , Madrid
      Attendance: 105,532
      Referee: Dean Harzic ( France )

      Rapid Wien Austria 1–1 Italy Milan
      R. Körner Goal 26 ( pen. ) Report Nordahl Goal 20
      Pfarrwiese , Vienna
      Attendance: 18,000
      Referee: Jaroslav Vlček ( Czechoslovakia )

      Note – differences in information: website RSSSF writes that goal on 26 minute scored Robert Körner, website UEFA writes that goal on 26 minute scored Alfred Körner

      Second leg[ edit ]

      Hibernian Scotland 1–0 Sweden Djurgården
      Turnbull Goal 70 Report
      Easter Road , Edinburgh
      Attendance: 31,346
      Referee: Arthur Edward Ellis ( England )

      Hibernian won 4–1 on aggregate.


      Vörös Lobogó Hungary 4–4 France Reims
      Lantos Goal 11 ( pen. )74 ( pen. )
      Palotás Goal 5382
      Report Glovacki Goal 6
      Bliard Goal 2044
      Templin Goal 52
      MTK Stadion , Budapest
      Attendance: 35,000
      Referee: John Husband ( England )

      Reims won 8–6 on aggregate.


      Partizan Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 3–0 Spain Real Madrid
      Milutinović Goal 2487
      Mihajlović Goal 46 ( pen. )
      Report
      Partizan Stadium , Belgrade
      Attendance: 40,000
      Referee: Josef Gulde ( Switzerland )

      Real Madrid won 4–3 on aggregate.


      Milan Italy 7–2 Austria Rapid Wien
      Mariani Goal 15
      Nordahl Goal 2350
      Ricagni Goal 2663
      Frignani Goal 56
      Schiaffino Goal 75
      Report Golobic Goal 35
      Dienst Goal 59
      San Siro , Milan
      Attendance: 35,000
      Referee: Leo Horn ( Netherlands )

      Milan won 8–3 on aggregate.

      Semi-finals[ edit ]

      Team 1 Agg.Team 21st leg2nd leg
      Reims France 3–0 Scotland Hibernian2–01–0
      Real Madrid Spain 5–4 Italy Milan4–21–2

      First leg[ edit ]

      Reims France 2–0 Scotland Hibernian
      Leblond Goal 67
      Bliard Goal 89
      Report
      Parc des Princes , Paris
      Attendance: 35,486
      Referee: Manuel Asensi Martín ( Spain )

      Real Madrid Spain 4–2 Italy Milan
      Rial Goal 6
      Iglesias Goal 25
      Olsen Goal 40
      Di Stéfano Goal 62
      Report Nordahl Goal 9
      Schiaffino Goal 30
      Santiago Bernabéu Stadium , Madrid
      Attendance: 129,690
      Referee: Dean Harzic ( France )

      Second leg[ edit ]

      Hibernian Scotland 0–1 France Reims
      Report Glovacki Goal 57
      Easter Road , Edinburgh
      Attendance: 44,941
      Referee: Arthur Edward Ellis ( England )

      Reims won 3–0 on aggregate.


      Milan Italy 2–1 Spain Real Madrid
      Dal Monte Goal 69 ( pen. )86 ( pen. ) Report Iglesias Goal 65
      San Siro , Milan
      Attendance: 30,000
      Referee: Erich Steiner ( Austria )

      Real Madrid won 5–4 on aggregate.

      Final[ edit ]

      Main article: 1956 European Cup Final
      Real Madrid Spain 4–3 France Reims
      Di Stéfano Goal 14
      Rial Goal 3079
      Marquitos Goal 67
      Report Leblond Goal 6
      Templin Goal 10
      Hidalgo Goal 62
      Parc des Princes , Paris
      Attendance: 38,239
      Referee: Arthur Edward Ellis ( England )

      Top goalscorers[ edit ]

      8 goals
      • Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Miloš Milutinović (Partizan)
      6 goals
      • Hungary Péter Palotás (Vörös Lobogó)
      • France Léon Glovacki (Stade Reims)
      5 goals
      • France René Bliard (Stade Reims)
      • Spain Héctor Rial (Real Madrid)
      • Argentina Alfredo Di Stéfano (Real Madrid)
      4 goals
      • Hungary Mihály Lantos (Vörös Lobogó)
      • Sweden Gunnar Nordahl (Milan)
      • France Michel Leblond (Stade Reims)
      3 goals
      • Austria Alfred Körner (Rapid Wien)
      • Belgium Hippolyte Van Den Bosch (Anderlecht)
      • Sweden John Eriksson (Djurgården)
      • Scotland Eddie Turnbull (Hibernian)
      • Italy Juan Alberto Schiaffino (Milan)
      • Italy Giorgio Dal Monte (Milan)
      • Spain Joseíto (Real Madrid)

      Notes[ edit ]

      1. ^ https://blog.lequipe.fr/histoire/2-avril-1955-lequipe-cree-la-coupe-deurope-de-football/
      2. ^ Match switched to Glasgow due to a frozen pitch in Sweden ( “Hibernian reach the first European Cup semi-finals 1956” . A Sporting Nation: Rock ‘n’ Roll Era 1950–1959. BBC. November 2005. Retrieved 18 April 2010.

        )

      External links[ edit ]

      • 1955–56 season at UEFA website
      • 1955–56 All matches – season at UEFA website
      • All scorers 1955–56 European Cup according to protocols UEFA
      • European Cup results at Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation
      • European Cup 1955-56 – results, protocols, players statistics
      • “50 years of the European Cup” (PDF). UEFA. October 2004. Retrieved 17 July 2008.
      • 1955-56 European Cup – results and line-ups (archive)
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